Jack Ginnivan Isaac Quaynor: Collingwood players’ behavior comes as no surprise to Gen Z men

Two AFL stars who were forced to delete a video on social media where they rated women out of 10 have been flogged.

People were shocked when two Collingwood AFL players made headlines for a TikTok video with the couple evaluating hypothetical women.

The thing is, Gen Z believes that’s not a shock to men.

While Collingwood stars Jack Ginnivan and Isaac Quaynor were following a current trend on the social networking platform, they completely lost their meaning.

On Monday, a TikTok video appeared showing Ginnivan and Quaynor lying in bed laughing while talking about women, causing another headache in Collingwood.

“And there are two, but it smells great,” Ginnivan said in a video.

Quaynor replies: “Three. It’s 10, but it has a few teeth, like these teeth go in every direction, diagonally, everything. ”

Quaynor later says, “She’s nine-thirty, but she’s homeless.”

Jinivan replies: “Two and a half.”

The trend is generally for some friends to rank hypothetical people with whom they could date, using silly personality flaws to see if it would change their ranking. Things like “he’s 10 but he puts the toilet paper in the wrong way” and “he’s 7 but he likes to read”.

For these two men – who simply did not understand the assignment – the ratings were mostly appearance-based and derogatory.

According to our speakers at Gen Z newsChat – news.com.au’s work with the Judith Nielson Institute – this is an attitude deeply rooted in our society’s half-hearted culture. It is also not strange, as frustrating as it is.

It is a common attitude in men

“It does not surprise me at all. In my experience, athletes are the main contenders for this particular brand of misogyny.

“This behavior is not limited to celebrities. I have met people in much of my life who engage in such discussions.
– Angus

“I agreed with Angus. This is the standard discussion in the locker room. I have honestly seen this at every age of my life – school, university and even corporate work.

“It always has a two-faced nature, where people behave very kindly, and then in the background, they have these conversations.”
– Jahin

“My mother is a feminist. From a young age I grew up as a feminist. My three brothers and I were all raised the same way, so around my family, I had never heard of such a thing.

“When I was a teenager, I started to have more experiences – especially when I was playing sports. Many of the topics my teammates would discuss were very half-hearted. “The amount of sexism in gambling, also, especially in online gambling, is absolutely disgusting.”
– Jasper

It is deeply embedded in our culture

Such attitudes still prevail, despite the slowly changing change in what society generally considers appropriate. Gen Z accuses a culture with deep roots in sexist ideals and beliefs.

“This kind of rhetoric goes back to the culture of rape. “I think it is very worrying that we continue to see these behaviors in our sports world.”
– Rachel

“I agree with Rach on this. We need to get better at a cultural change in the way we talk about men and women on social media and in our everyday language.

“It does not have to be a rating system for appearance – it minimizes someone based only on their physical appearance, instead of being attractive based on their personality. “He is wrong and deeply upset.”
– Ελεμάρνη

“It’s another symptom of a toxic culture permeating male-dominated sports, where violence and dehumanization of women is the norm.

“When rape and abuse in vulnerable communities happen, they do not happen out of nowhere. This is how they start: “seemingly ‘harmless’ jokes that become civilization”.
– Amani

“The question is: why do these people feel the need to talk about women this way behind closed doors?

“Every now and then these videos reach the web and every time we go through the same accountability cycle, they apologize and some people above say that it is ‘just’ a discussion in the locker room. “There is no change here until there is a bigger cultural change.”
– Νιχ

Celebrities should set an example

Although this type of attitude is unfortunately still common to some groups of men, Gen Z believes that being famous means that you have to have higher standards. They hold out the hope that the right extensions could be the beginning of a real change.

“I think there is a level of responsibility that implies being a public figure, which means that there is an urgent need to correct these patterns of behavior in a timely manner.

“However, I think for these two there is an opportunity for a precautionary and responsible consequence. I do not think that this consequence should be their cancellation, because sometimes I feel like letting coaches and people in power.

“I want to see them disciplined and sincerely remorseful. “I think it’s up to the coach and those who deal directly with these men to instill a higher level of self-respect which then translates into respect for others.”
– Amani

“It’s disgusting, and the extensions should be treated accordingly, as they have so many young people looking forward to them.”
– Jahin

“When high profile athletes continue to do so – especially on the Internet – they need to be prepared to deal with the consequences. Loss of work, income and sponsorships is a fairly appropriate punishment, I would say.

“I do not think you will ever regret these people. “I sincerely believe that most of them do not believe that their attitude towards women is wrong.”

– Angus

“Athletes in particular are often adored in a way that is unique to the sport. “They have a responsibility to their fans and their team to set an example for the next generation of players.”
– Jasper

“There seems to be a different standard for athletes. People – mostly high-ranking executives in the sports industry and government – would describe it as a discussion in the locker room.

“I believe that the punishment should be imposed by sponsors and senior executives. “Take away their money if they feel the need to treat people like a movie score with rotten tomatoes.”
– Νιχ

Are you 18 and 24 years old and want to join the discussion?

Want to share your thoughts on being a Gen Z person in the modern world? If you are between 18 and 24 years old, contact me at kassia.byrnes@news.com.au.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*